A group of indie music publishers is joining the karaoke lawsuit filed last spring by Sybersound Records against six other karaoke record manufacturers. The lawsuit claims the six karaoke record manuf

A group of indie music publishers is joining the karaoke lawsuit filed last spring by Sybersound Records against six other karaoke record manufacturers. The lawsuit claims the six karaoke record manufacturers have an unfair--and illegal--advantage because of their failure to license compositions for karaoke.

Billboard.biz has learned that the publishers become plaintiffs with Sybersound, which does business as Party Tyme Karaoke, in a copyright infringement lawsuit being filed today (Aug. 11) in federal District Court in Los Angeles.

Sybersound filed suit last May in the Los Angeles County Superior Court against some of its competitors, claiming that their failure to license compositions allows them to price their products lower than Sybersound’s properly-licensed packages.

The publishers and the compositions in which they claim an interest are Mark Hybner Publishing ("Chicks Dig It," "Laredo"), Full Circle Music Publishing ("Homewrecker"), Skronk Bonk Tunes ("How Am I Doin'"), World House Hits ("Monday Morning Church"), SHC d/b/a Steele Wheels Music ("Nothin 'Bout Love Makes Sense") and Logrhythm Music ("Miss Independent").

Sybersound adds copyright infringement to its claims for various unfair trade practices. The complaint alleges that the company holds exclusive karaoke rights infringed by the defendants covering 26 songs ncluding “Goodies,” “Lean Back,” “Let Me Blow Ya Mind,” “Naughty Girl” and “Yeah.”

Defendants named in the federal suit are UAV d/b/a Karaoke Bay and Sterling Entertainment; Madacy Entertainment d/b/a Karaoke Party; Audio Stream d/b/a/ Keynote Karaoke; Top Tunes; and Singing Machine.

A spokesman for Sybersound tells Billboard.biz that the publishers contacted the company after reading about the earlier lawsuits and sought to join its legal fight. Sybersound is voluntarily dismissing its state lawsuit and replacing it with the federal suit.