In the wake of an Australian court ruling that the operators of P2P service Kazaa authorized copyright infringement, Canadian music labels on Sept. 6 urged Ottawa to toughen this country's Internet pi

TORONTO (The Hollywood Reporter) -- In the wake of an Australian court ruling that the operators of P2P service Kazaa authorized copyright infringement, Canadian music labels on Sept. 6 urged Ottawa to toughen this country's Internet piracy laws.

"The law that is currently on the books -- that's enforced -- is so antiquated that the net result has been, despite all of our best efforts, that Canada has become a piracy haven," said Graham Henderson, president of the Canadian Recording Industry Assn.

The Canadian music labels have thus far failed to thwart Internet programs like Kazaa in the courts here. Most recently, the Federal Court of Appeal dismissed an appeal of an earlier ruling that denied major music producers access to the names of 29 serial digital music uploaders.

The CRIA said some among the 29 alleged music pirates were using pseudonyms that tied them to the Kazaa program.

The landmark March 2004 Canadian P2P ruling stymied efforts by Canadian music producers to pursue file-swappers in the courts here by concluding that trading music files on Internet networks like Kazaa was not illegal in Canada.

Henderson said loopholes in Canadian law may allow Kazaa, Grokster and other music uploading programs to find refuge in Canada as rival legal jurisdictions close off their activity.

"We run the danger of perpetuating our status as a piracy haven, a modern day digital Barbary Coast, unless parliamentarians step in," he urged.