Promoters are in discussions with the directors of the new Wembley Stadium about the future of a string of high-profile concerts which are booked for the venue this summer.

Promoters are in discussions with the directors of the new Wembley Stadium about the future of a string of high-profile concerts which are booked for the venue this summer.

Multiplex, the Australian construction company which is building Wembley, has been beset by problems that have pushed-back the opening of the venue.

Concerts by Bon Jovi, the Rolling Stones, Robbie Williams and Take That are scheduled between June and September at the stadium, which is intended to be England's showpiece sporting and concerts venue.

A Wembley spokesperson says, "We're in talks with the promoters but are not in a position to comment at the moment."

Rob Hallet, senior VP of AEG Live, said in a statement that he was confident Bon Jovi's planned curtain-raising concerts will go ahead as anticipated.

"We are working closely with Wembley concerning the two Bon Jovi shows scheduled on June 10 and June 11," said Hallet. "Everyone at the company appreciates that these are extremely difficult circumstances."

He added that AEG was "considering all of our options."

Bon Jovi was the last rock concert to take place at the north London stadium in August 2000 before it closed and the process of gradual demolition began in September 2002.

The iconic original Wembley Stadium hosted the 1948 Olympic Games, the 1966 soccer World Cup and the 1985 Live Aid concert.

The new 90,000-capacity stadium is being built on behalf of, and run by, Wembley National Stadium Ltd, a subsidiary of England's Football Association.

Following an inspection, officials from the FA yesterday conceded that the venue would not be ready in time for the FA Cup Final on May 13 and that some subsequent sporting fixtures would have to be rearranged.

"It is still too early to say exactly when the stadium will open," Wembley Stadium CEO Michael Cunnah said in a statement.