Britain's Music Publishers’ Assn. has forged an agreement with the Institute of Practitioners in Advertising on a synchronization license for music.

Britain's Music Publishers’ Assn. has forged an agreement with the Institute of Practitioners in Advertising on a synchronization license for music.

The new license, unveiled today (Feb. 24), is designed to streamline and speed up the process of licensing music for use in commercials for both advertisers and music publishers.

"Music has been used to promote and sell products for decades," comments MPA CEO Stephen Navin in a statement. "But ever since Nick Kamen removed his Levi's to the accompaniment of Marvin Gaye singing Norman/Barrett's 'I Heard It Through the Grapevine,' music publishers have stepped up their efforts to help advertising agencies create a powerful and long-lasting impact through the imaginative and frequently inspired use of music in commercials."

Navin, until recently an adviser to the U.K.'s Department of Culture, Media and Sport on music, joined the MPA as chief executive in January.

Speaking on the new arrangement, Sarah Martin, chair of the IPA Commercials Production Policy Group, said it represented a "great step forward" for the organizations' respective members. In a statement, Martin said, "Agency producers will be delighted that our two industries have been able to agree on a standard contract."

The IPA is a London-based trade body and professional institute which counts 241 member agencies from Britain's advertising, media and marketing communications industries.

To commemorate its 125th anniversary this year, the MPA will host a function July 6 at London's Old Billingsgate Market.