Soribada, South Korea's most popular file-sharing service, says it will be back online in March, four months after the Seoul District Court ordered it shut down.

Soribada, South Korea's most popular file-sharing service, says it will be back online in March, four months after the Seoul District Court ordered it shut down.

At a joint press conference in Seoul on Monday (Feb. 27), Soribada and the Korean Assn. of Phonogram Producers said they had reached a settlement to their longstanding legal battle which would see Soribada pay KAPP 8.5 billion won ($8.9 million) and resume operations using a paid-subscription service model.

Soribada co-founder Yang Zyung-hwan said his company will spend March examining how customers use the latest version of the file-sharing software, before charging subscribers in April.

Developed in 2000 by brothers Yang Zyung-hwan and Yang Il-hwan, Soribada quickly grew into Korea's most popular file-sharing service with more than 22 million people registered at its peak. From the beginning, it clashed with the music industry, alternately winning and losing court battles and altering its software.

On Oct. 31, the Seoul District Court ordered Soribada to shut down in response to a lawsuit filed by KAPP accusing the company of copyright violations.