ASCAP reported increased revenues for 2005 totaling more than $749 million, $50 million more than the prior year. The 6% increase resulted in royalty payments to members topping $645 million.

ASCAP reported increased revenues for 2005 totaling more than $749 million, $50 million more than the prior year. The 6% increase resulted in royalty payments to members topping $645 million.

“At a time when the music industry is in a state of rapid change and many view technology as a challenge to copyright and music creators, we are using sophisticated technology along with other innovative business strategies to grow our participation in the music marketplace and to secure the value our members deserve for their creative efforts,” says CEO John LoFrumento.

In 2005, cable TV revenues grew more than 20% to $126 million, while new media revenues increased 50% to $8.1 million.

International revenues increased 4.3% to nearly $215 million. "Over the last year the U.S. dollar has pretty much stayed low," says LoFrumento. "About half of the money growth is coming from currency [exchange rates] and the other half coming from the popularity of our repertoire."

Meanwhile, ASCAP’s operating costs reached an all-time low of 12.5% of revenues. LoFrumento attributes that to its MediaGuide technology and overall efficiency.

This year issues related to online music use will be on the agenda. "We're going into rate court with the new media companies -- AOL, RealNetwork, Yahoo and others -- because there is an issue about what part of their revenues are allocable to our members," LoFrumento says. He expects a resolution by November.

In related news, ASCAP will be presenting its national conference, "I Create Music," dedicated to songwriting and composing on April 20-22 at the Renaissance Hollywood Hotel in Los Angeles.