Apple Corps and Apple Computer faced off in London's High Court today (March 29) in the latest stage of an enduring trademark battle.

Apple Corps and Apple Computer faced off in London's High Court today (March 29) in the latest stage of an enduring trademark battle.

Apple Corps, the Beatles' record company, is accusing Apple Computer of breaching the terms of a deal reached in 1991 over the Apple trademark. The label claims that the computer maker's push into the digital music business with the iTunes Music Store violates the agreement.

The earlier agreement was reached after the record company sued the computer maker for using the famous apple mark. Apple Corps says that the deal prohibited the computer giant from using the Apple name and logo for the promotion of music products.

Geoffrey Vos, a lawyer representing Apple Corps, argued in court that characterizing the download system as an electronic device -- and not music-related -- was a "perversion" of the constraints laid down in the agreement.

Apple Computer's argument that it uses the apple mark only in connection with a delivery system was "plainly wrong," he said.

Apple Corps was created by the Beatles in 1968, and to this day continues to represent the interests of the band. It is seeking both an injunction to enforce the 1991 agreement and monetary damages for the alleged contract breach.

Apple Computer said before the trial that "unfortunately, Apple and Apple Corps now have differing interpretations of this agreement and will need to ask a court to resolve this dispute."

Representatives from both parties declined to comment while the case was ongoing.

Apple Corps sued Apple Computer in September 2003. In April 2004, a London judge dismissed an application in which the computer maker argued that the full case should be dealt with by courts in California, not England.

Sources say the trial is expected to last until at least April 6.