Final debate on France's long-awaited copyright bill won't resume before mid-June, industry sources say. Concluding discussions on the bill were anticipated around May 30.

Final debate on France's long-awaited copyright bill won't resume before mid-June, industry sources say. Concluding discussions on the bill were anticipated around May 30.

In a joint statement issued today (June 2), labels trade body Snep and independent labels trade organization UPFI expressed concerns on further delays to adoption of the text.

The trade bodies stressed the "need for France to bring without further delay its legal framework on copyright in line with the one adopted and applied by its European partners."

According to sources, the delay may have been caused by politicians from both right and left wings, along with artist and software organizations, lobbying to return the bill to parliament to be re-debated.

Prime minister Dominique de Villepin is expected to convene a dedicated commission of seven members of the Senate (upper house) and seven members of Parliament (lower house) to negotiate the bill. Sources at the Ministry of Culture tell Billboard.biz that the commission is moving ahead.

With the 2007 presidential elections approaching, the debate on copyright is getting ever more political in France. Potential socialist contender Ségolène Royal recently made headlines when she advocated the controversial "global license" system for file-sharing music. The "global license" is unlikely to appear on the final text.

Interoperability is at the heart of the debate. The Senate withdrew an obligation for digital rights management technology firms to make public all necessary information to ensure interoperability, a decision that was slammed at the time by Apple Computer as promoting "state-sponsored piracy."