British pop star Seal was today (June 22) told by a High Court judge that he must pay up to £1 million ($1.8 million) to the former manager he claimed had "ripped him off".

British pop star Seal was today (June 22) told by a High Court judge that he must pay up to £1 million ($1.8 million) to the former manager he claimed had "ripped him off".

Mr Justice Charles Gray ruled the singer was contractually obliged to pay commission more than ten years after the partnership finished.

The judge backed a claim by John Wadlow, who was Seal's manager until 1995, for further payments under management agreements made in 1990 and 1995.

He rejected Seal's claim that he was a victim of undue influence, and ordered an account to be made of the commission to be paid to Wadlow. Wadlow had sought up to £1 million.

In addition to the commission, Seal must also pay Wadlow's legal costs -- estimated at around £500,000 ($915,000) -- and was ordered to make an interim payment in respect of those of £175,000 ($320,000) by July 21. When his own legal costs are added to this, Seal is likely to face a legal bill in the region of £2 million ($3.6 million).

Earlier this month, Seal took to the witness box at London's High Court. Seal, whose hits include "Crazy," "Killer," and "Kiss From a Rose," argued that Wadlow was not entitled to commission on his earnings from his first two albums, claiming that the agreements were the result of undue influence or constitute an "unreasonable restraint of trade".

However, the said ruled today: "In my judgment the settlement agreement was plainly not procured by undue influence."

During the hearing Seal told the judge: "My relationship with John was like he was a surrogate father to me. There was no reason to distrust him."

He added, "I had signed a deal with Mr Wadlow indicating that I would have to pay him in perpetuity for the rest of my life. I had a conversation with my (current) manager saying 'this is ridiculous, I cannot keep paying someone for doing nothing'."

Seal said that, in the five years after he parted company with Wadlow in 1995, he paid him $4 million, which he said was "in my book a substantial amount of money."

However, he denied that the reason he stopped paying Wadlow in 2000 was that he was having trouble with money.