The 2003 Hollywood comedy "School of Rock," which starred actor-cum-sometime musician Jack Black, could become a thing of reality in England if the recommendations made in major new report are carried

The 2003 Hollywood comedy "School of Rock," which starred actor-cum-sometime musician Jack Black, could become a thing of reality in England if the recommendations made in major new report are carried forward.

According to the document, published today (Oct. 18), England's primary school children should be trained to sing as part of a new emphasis on musical activities leading up to the 2012 London Olympic Games.

The publication, issued by the government-backed Music Manifesto, also calls for the establishment of local "music education hubs," with an aim to "maximise the impact and offer quality music making to all children, wherever they live." Artists, the music industry, local authorities and schools are urged to work together on the project.

More than 50 recommendations are made in the "Making Every Child's Music Matter" report, the goal of which is to boost the teaching of music to England's youths. Over 600 groups and individuals involved in music were consulted for the report.

The government today welcomed the report's recommendations. "From orchestras and choirs to MTV and iPod, music is the life blood of our young people and it is this nation's common currency," commented Britain's culture minister David Lammy in a statement. "The Music Manifesto's report recognizes this and will help us extend music's reach even further."

Schools minister Andrew Adonis added, "We know that music can make a unique contribution to education by boosting pupils' self-confidence and attainment. That's why we are providing support to Music Services and schools totalling £83 million in 2007-2008."

The report is launched during the National Music Week for schools, which concludes Friday (Oct. 20).