-- Brite Revolution was profiled by The Tennessean and is worth reading about. The Nashville-based startup, starting with funds in the mid-six figures, offers subscribers downloads, videos, interviews and performance news for $4.99 per month. The current 20-artist roster is 95% singer-songwriters and Nashville is well represented. Brite Revolution adds two new songs from each artist every month and gives 10% of all revenues to charitable causes it lists on the site. It's a good idea that delivers unique content in a personable way, but the jury is out on models with such limited selection. This is more "Single of the Month Club" than music store. (The Tennessean)

-- Two Harvard Business School professors wrote a case study on the business lessons in the creation and success of "Kind of Blue," Miles Davis's legendary album. "'Kind of Blue' was also a commercial success - the most commercially successful jazz album ever, in fact, which makes it worthy of examination in a business context. Davis himself is a fascinating example of a 'manager' of creative people and processes. His ability to nurture talent is legendary. ... Finally, the process that led to 'Kind of Blue' is an example of pushing boundaries and taking experimentation right up to the edge of failure in the pursuit of something new; Davis pushed his musicians 'to the edge,' but he did it in a way that effectively managed the risks." (Working Knowledge)

-- Original Sin Records will receive marketing and promotional services from Universal Motown Records. (Press release)

-- People are piling on Live Nation. Now the company's VIP Nation program has come under scrutiny. The program diverts certain seats away from the primary market in order to generate more revenue. It's basically a form of price discrimination that bypasses the secondary market. People who value seats more will pay more through this value-added service. Live Nation calls it a "convenience" program but noted it "does not guarantee premium seat locations." The VIP Nation Web site calls itself a "premium access program" that offers VIP benefits and is good for "entertaining clients, rewarding employees, or socializing with friends and family." (Ticket News)

-- AEG Live and the City of Orlando have a tentative agreement for a two-year deal under which AEG would book events at Orlando venues, and split (40/60) net revenue with the city. (Orlando Business Journal)

-- President Obama has appointed Ian Gershengorn to be the Department of Justice's deputy assistant attorney of the Civil Division. Gershengorn is notable because he marks the fifth Obama administration appointment that has represented the RIAA while working for law firm Jenner & Block. He represented the record labels in the Grokster case. (Threat Level)

-- Twitter has not become a common marketing tool for music, but that may change as people discover the ease with which they can use it to share hyperlinks to MP3 files. Mike Skinner, a.k.a. The Streets, has said he will give away three new songs via his Twitter page. As of today, Skinner has over 18,000 followers on Twitter. (NME.com)