-- Charles Nesson, the Harvard law school professor defending Joel Tenenaum in a file-sharing case against the RIAA, details what drove him to take the case in an op-ed for Ars Technica. In sum, he thinks the RIAA's litigation campaign is "an unconstitutional aburse of law," that copyright laws are "have not yet fully acknowledged and addressed the ubiquity by which protected information is readily-and freely-available on the Internet," and compares the cased as a David-vs-Goliath battle. (Ars Technica)

-- RoyaltyShare is scaling back its digital distribution efforts, having let go of two employees and no longer taking new customers for the service. It will instead focus on its core royalty and sales management business. (PaidContent)

-- The feud between Last.fm and tech news blog TechCrunch has heated up, with TechCruch repeating and updating its claims that the digital music service is providing the RIAA with user data in violation of its code of privacy and Last.fm sticking to its stance that the story is nonsense. The new TechCrunch story states, citing unnamed sources, that Last.fm parent company CBS requested user data for "internal purposes," which it subsequently provided to the RIAA on request. Last.fm continues to say the story is totally false, sparking a bit of a Twitter war between TechCrunch editor Michael Arrington and Last.fm developer Russ Garrett. Most of the tit-for-tat is mired in details of how stories are written and sourced. Just as TechCrunch is quick to post as confirmed news rumors based on anonymous sources, so are big music companies like Last.fm and CBS slow to provide clarity on issues they'd rather not discuss.