-- In response to an op-ed from Charles Nesson, the Harvard Law professor who is representing Joel Tenenbaum in a file-sharing case, the general counsel to the RIAA, Steven Marks, lays out a fair and well-written defense of the RIAA's anti-piracy strategy and the Tenenbaum case (which he compares to a three-ring circus). He concludes with this: "Ultimately, this case, despite the legal theatrics, is just like any other: a means to an end. And that end is a vibrant, thriving legal marketplace that offers fans a rich, diverse array of models to enjoy music and properly rewards musicians and record companies for their work." (Ars Technica)

-- Followers of the growing online music locker services should take note of the recent decision by the U.S. Solicitor General to side with the Second Circuit's ruling that Cablevision's network DVR service does not infringe copyrights. The network DVR is an online, remote storage system for media recorded by the user. Online storage services for music are primed to increase in the coming years as mobile handsets and other WiFi-enabled devices, limited in their storage capability, need ways to better connect users to their music collections. (LA Times)

-- UK-based Seatwave, which bills itself as a fan-to-fan ticket exchange, has received $17 million in fourth-round funding. That raises its total funding to $53 million. (TechCrunch)

-- The City of Fort Worth is proposing to build a 6,500-seat amphitheater. The facility is six or seven years away from construction. (Star-Telegram.com)

-- To commemorate today's tenth anniversary of the launch of Napster, the SF Chronicle has a 36-minute audio interview with the application's creator, Shawn Fanning. (SF Chronicle)