-- By all accounts, Julius Genachowski breezed through his hearing as President Obama's nomination to be FCC chairman. Genachowski , a former executive at InterActive Corp. and a co-founder of LaunchBox Digital and Rock Creek Ventures, said he is "energized" by the innovation in the mobile sector and believes the U.S. had an opportunity to lead the world in mobile. (Washington Post)

-- A recap of the third day of the Capitol vs. Thomas-Rasset file-sharing case. "After three years of litigation, after defenses that ranged from a hijacked wireless signal to 'putting the RIAA on trial' to fair use to 'no certified copies, so you lose,' to a simple 'I didn't do it,' Jammie Thomas-Rasset today told a new story to explain the mountain of forensic and other circumstantial evidence pointing to the conclusion that she had downloaded and distributed over 1,700 songs using Kazaa: I didn't do it, but it might have been my ex-boyfriend and kids. And who knows? It just might work." (Copyrights & Campaigns)

-- As EMI sues Grooveshark, Ben Patterson of digital distributor DashGo explains why he pulled his music from the online streaming service. Patterson extends the letter to include his thoughts on free streaming services in general. It's hard to argue with this take: "If a user SEARCHES for the music and listens to it for free in an environment where someone ELSE has posted the music and the band doesn't have the option to ask for an email address or even pitch a tour or merch or actual album, then the service is just ripping off the band by giving free content to someone who asked for it - not promoting it to a new fan or adding a filter that helps expose and distinguish music." (MediaMemo)

-- YouTube, claims infotech services company RampRate, is losing about $175 million a year. That's a big difference versus the Credit Suisse estimate of $471 million in annual losses that created a wave of pessimism about the financial viability of streaming media sites. RampRate believes Google, the owner of YouTube, pays far less for bandwidth than Credit Suisse had believed. The reason for the cost savings is peering, which is where separate Internet networks exchange traffic with one another at reduced or no cost. Not only does peering mean YouTube may be losing far less money than believed, but it is believed YouTube gives Google a great deal of leverage in negotiating peering contracts. As a result, YouTube's incredible amount of traffic saves Google money. (The Tech Beat)

-- The judge in the Joel Tenenbaum file sharing case has lost patience with the antics of the defense team, but she granted it the right to use "fair use" as a defense (which should be fascinating) and will allow two defense witnesses to be deposed via the Internet. (Ars Technica)

-- Spotify is giving its premium members more services: mobile access, bundled downloads, social networking features, better audio quality, recommendations and ticketing. It's odd that an additional revenue stream, ticketing, is not available to users of the free version. If most users had upgraded to the premium version, that ticketing decision would make sense. But Spotify's ability to lure users to the paid-for, premium version is in question. An executive from Universal Music Group told a NARM panel audience last week that few Spotify users were upgrading to the premium version. (Tech Digest)

-- Sonic Youth nearly pulled off a rare 70/20/10 in first week sales of its new Matador release, "The Eternal." CD sales represented 71% of total sales while digital accounted for 19% and vinyl represented 10% of sales. With first-week sales of nearly 20,000, The Eternal debuted at #19 on the Billboard Top 200 album chart. As a point of comparison, the Black Eyed Peas' E.N.D. also had a 19% digital share but had no vinyl sales. Another debut nearly had a 10% LP share - but didn't sell much on CD. The Dirty Projectors' "Bitte Orca," out on Domino, finished its first week with a 30/63/8 split for CD/digital/LP, an usual format breakdown for an album at #65 on the chart.