-- A few weeks ago, Pandora changed its music submission policy to require artists to submit a CD that is for sale at Amazon.com - that means it must have a barcode and be a part of the $29.95-per-year Amazon Advantage Program. Seems like a fair quality control measure. Criticism ensued, and Hypebot asked Pandora founder Tim Westergren for a comment. "There are really three principal reasons: user experience, improving the meta data, and managing submissions," he wrote. (Hypebot)

-- UK firm Detica, in partnership with SoundExchange, has launched a tool called A Price for Music that will forecast such things has piracy and impact of price changes. The goal, according to the product Web site: "Its objective is to stimulate debate by providing stakeholders and commentators with the ability to estimate the financial impact that different services may have on music industry revenues over time." (A Price For Music, via Music Ally)

-- People were gaming the system (fake accounts, favoriting their own tracks) to get to the "popular page" at MP3 blog aggregator Hype Machine. The site's operators put an end to that and posted a list of the artists believed to have benefited from the manipulation. If relatively unknown artists will go to these measures to get noticed on Hype Machine, just imagine what people would do to increase their share of pooled revenue in a legal P2P system. (Hype Machine blog, via Music Machinery)

-- Grammy Award-winning musician/producer Joel Guzman is one of the partners in Villa's Music Garden, a new outdoor music venue in Austin, Texas. (Examiner)