The circumstances surrounding Michael Jackson's death have become a federal issue, with the Drug Enforcement Administration asked to help police take a look at the pop star's doctors and possible drug use.

Following Jackson's death, allegations emerged that the 50-year-old King of Pop had been consuming painkillers, sedatives and antidepressants.

The DEA was asked to help the probe by the Los Angeles Police Department, a law enforcement official in Washington told the Associated Press on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the investigation.

The federal agency can provide resources and experience in investigating drug abuse, illicit drug manufacturers known as "pill mills" and substances local police may not be familiar with, the official said Wednesday.

Medium Uri Geller, a former Jackson confidant, said Thursday he tried to keep Jackson from abusing painkillers and other prescription drugs, but others in the singer's circle kept him supplied.

"When Michael asked for something, he got it. This was the great tragedy," Geller said in a telephone interview with the AP from his suburban London home.

While the investigation into the singer's death deepened, passionate Michael Jackson fans spent another day in an uneasy limbo, awaiting word from the King of Pop's camp about where and when a memorial service might be held for their hero - and if they're even invited.

Speculation about the potential location of a memorial ricocheted during the day from the Staples Center to the Los Angeles Coliseum to the Nokia Theater.

One spot that was ruled out as an immediate memorial venue was Jackson's sprawling Neverland ranch in Santa Barbara County. Jackson family spokesman Ken Sunshine said a public memorial was in the works for Jackson but it wouldn't be held at Neverland.

Jermaine Jackson said in an interview that aired on NBC's "Today" show Thursday that he would still like to see Neverland as his younger brother's final resting place.

He also said that he wishes he had died instead of Michael.

"He went too soon," Jermaine Jackson said. "I don't know how people are going to take this, but I wish it was me."

The elimination of the proposed Neverland memorial came as a blow to many Jackson fans who had already descended on the estate in the rolling hills near Santa Barbara with the hope of attending a public viewing.

"We're terribly disappointed," said Ida Barron, 44, who arrived with her husband Paul Barron, 56, intending to spend several days in a tent.

It appeared more likely that a funeral and burial would take place in Los Angeles, a person familiar with the situation told The Associated Press.

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