-- Live Nation has teamed up with 7-11 for a Slurpee promotion. Slurpee buyers who enter the promotional code, found on the side of the cup, at the Slurpee website are eligible to buy select lawn tickets to Live Nation concerts for $7.11. (Tallahassee.com)

-- In the Joel Tenenbaum file-sharing case, Judge Nancy Gertner has ordered Charles Nesson, attorney for Tenenbaum, to explain he or the defendant should not be sanctioned for posting on the Internet recordings of depositions in the case. (Copyrights & Campaigns)

-- Reading for lawyers, those interested in public policy and people who couldn't believe Jammie Thomas-Rasset was ordered to pay the RIAA $1.92 million: Pamela Samuelson and Tara Wheatland, "Statutory Damages in Copyright Law: A Remedy in Need of Reform." (Berkeley Center for Law and Technology)

-- NPR asks, "Do record labels matter?" (NPR.org)

-- Related: NPR has a poll that asks visitors whether or not record labels matter. Fifty-one percent say they do not buy music because of the label it's on. Sixty-one percent say it doesn't matter if a band goes from small to big label. Responders of all ages are equally split on whether or not record labels matter to them. Fifty-nine percent say they have visited a record label website to hear new music. (NPR.org)

-- Spotify says it will surpass two million UK users this week and has struck a deal with Sky to promote the TV broadcaster's coverage of a cricket series between England and Australia. (MediaWeek)

-- Dirk Smillie at Forbes.com takes a look at influential music site Pitchfork. "Since its launch Pitchfork has grown to a full-time staff of 17 who operate from a second-floor loft above a yoga center in Wicker Park, a hipster Chicago neighborhood. The site averages 1.8 million visitors a month, who generate some 23 million page views. Writers earn $80 to $110 for a review, paid by ads sold to a dozen national advertisers, including Apple and Toyota, who have stuck with Pitchfork during the recession." (Forbes.com)

-- A Spanish judge said a P2P network does not violate, in principle, any right protected by intellectual property law. On copying, the judge wrote, "Adding a work or video recording to Emule, that has previously been converted to a compatible computer file, is not an act of reproduction." (TorrentFreak)