-- In its Global Mobile Broadband Traffic Report for Q2 2009, Allot Communications says mobile HTTP streaming, with sequential quarter growth rate of 58%, is the fastest growing use for mobile data. HTTP streaming covers sites like Hulu, MySpace and YouTube. HTTP downloads constitute 19% of mobile broadband traffic worldwide and have a growth rate twice that of P2P. In the Americas, according to the report, HTTP downloading accounts for 35% of mobile data usage, followed by HTTP streaming with 23%, P2P with 21% and HTTP browsing with 16%. (Allot Communications, via Ars Technica. Registration required to download report.)

-- Watermarked promo CDs are (a) still favored by many record labels and (b) of dubious effectiveness. The article has only anecdotal evidence on watermarks' positive impact on sales and negative impact on getting reviews. Def Jux, for example, will continue to add promo drops. Sub Pop hasn't sent out watermarked CDs in over a year. Harder evidence, admittedly difficult to procure, would have helped the reader draw conclusions (e.g., did Sub Pop get more reviews when it ceased watermarking CDs, and did its sales improve as a result?) And since pre-release press isn't what it used to be - artists and labels post news and music and various web sites, blogs cover upcoming releases and post approved streams and MP3 links - there is less need for traditional album reviews. (Washington City Paper)

-- The Southern California Broadcasters Association has taken issue with a Boston.com story that portrays radio as almost being on its death bed. The article doesn't cite one statistic showing changes in listening habits the type of young adults it quotes. Here's a blurb from a well reasoned response to the article from Mary Beth Garber, president of the SCBA: "Granted, younger people have iPods/MP3s (about 7 out of 10, although the number goes down as the age goes up over 17, according to Edison Research), most use the Internet, and many have cell phones with texting capabilities. But radio still outreaches all of that. ... The dude with 6,000 songs and hours to search for new music isn't likely to be a regular listener to radio. Fortunately, the other 9 out of 10 young people are." (Radio Ink)