-- What's a sure sign that a product is not working as well as was hoped? When that product is changed just one year after its launch. Case in point: Nokia is extending Comes With Music subscriptions in the U.K. by 90 days. So 12-month contracts get a 25% boost to 15-month contracts. "We're going to give you more," the company told subscribers in an email. "We are giving you another 90 days of musical freedom at no cost at all." The service was launched in the U.K. in September 2008. It has been plagued by lack of interest by both mobile carriers and consumers. (Music Ally and Reuters)

-- This video and the photos of Microsoft's in-the-works tablet, called Courier, indicate no music features. But they're worth checking out because such a device has the ability to breathe new life into how people experience music products. Apple's iTunes LP is a nice step forward, but it's currently tied to a computer monitor. A tablet is the sort of portable device that can make interactive albums a lot of fun. Digital music's strength is its ability to go mobile. Outside of possible music applications, the Courier looks like a fantastic device. (Gizmodo and I'm Just Being Manan)

-- Jack Johnson is harnessing the power of his Twitter followers to promote his new live album. Users send a form letter (form tweet?) to their followers and in return will get a free MP3. Nice. It's simple, probably cost next to nothing, and will most likely be very effective. Oniracom, the company that runs Johnson's website, offers a case study on its efforts to increase Matisyahu's Twitter following and improve his Twittering. (For example, Matisyahu generated buzz by inviting five Twitter followers to his band rehearsal). (Mashable)

-- From a profile of Rockaway Records, in the Silver Lake neighborhood of Los Angeles, and owners Wayne and Gary Johnson: "The Johnsons have survived, they say, thanks to a simple philosophy. 'You have to know what you're doing,' Wayne said, 'You can't wing it anymore. It used to be easy to buy collections and turn them around and sell them for more than what you paid. But now, there are so many avenues -- people can go on Amazon or EBay and find out what stuff is worth. Now you really have to know the market.'" (Los Angeles Times)

-- Web analytics are the shiny new toy of the Internet (music marketers have a number of options at their disposal). But as this eMarketer article shows, companies find it difficult to interpret and act upon the data. Almost one fourth cited complexity as a limiting factor. Nearly one half of respondents cited integration with other marketing solutions as a big challenge. The moral of the story is that web analytics can be very helpful but a company needs to be able to properly interpret the numbers and then actually do something about them. (eMarketer)

-- Music-oriented Web analytics company Band Metrics has received an investment by the Georgia Tech Edison Fund. (Hypebot)

-- Online music service we7 has launched "we7 Presents," an online showcase for unsigned acts. Each ten-week promotion will feature artists selected by we7 staff and writers for the likes of NME and Music Week. (The Guardian)

-- The state of mobile video: promise versus progress. While mobile video's reach is up 70% year-over-year, half of U.S. subscribers do not own video-capable phones. Among those who do watch mobile video, their satisfaction with their overall experience dropped over the last year. (Nielsen Wire)

-- Universal Music Publishing has signed a worldwide deal with Danny Elfman, the Oingo Boingo co-founder and Hollywood composer. The deal covers the Oingo Boingo catalog as well as publishing interest Elfman has in his film compositions. (Press release)