-- The third Jammie Thomas-Rasset trial is set for October 4. It will deal only with damages. Thomas-Rasset’s first two trials resulted in guilty verdicts. The first verdict was thrown due to misleading jury instructions. The second verdict was reduced by the judge, which leads us to the third trial. The plaintiffs were allowed to accept the judge’s reduced award or opt for a third trial. (Copyrights & Campaigns)

-- Attendance at the 2010 Country Radio Broadcasters conference, which closed Friday, was up 3.5%. (Music Row)

-- Nokia’s Ovi Music Store is, as Engadget puts it, “slowly shedding its DRM shackles globally.” Nokia’s Comes With Music subscription service still has DRM. Individual downloads are being sold without DRM. Nokia says its music catalog is up to about nine million songs with an emphasis on local content in the 22 stores it operates. (Engadget)

-- The Android app marketplace is getting enough sales for one programmer to earn $13,000 per month for an app that ranks from #100 to #200 in the paid category. The app took off after it become a featured app at the marketplace. Interesting side note: the maker of the car locater app found that sales dropped by less than 50% when he doubled the price to $3.99 from $1.99. (TechCrunch)

-- TheNextWeb asks a good question: “Whatever happened to Peter Gabriel-backed The Filter?” After a “blaze of hype” upon its launch two years ago, The Filter, an online music discovery service that offers personalized entertainment and information, has been quiet. Today comes news The Filter has a deal to provide recommendations for video site Dailymotion. The company says to expect more partners for its recommendation services. “I see the market for personal recommendations and relevance growing dramatically over the next 18 months ,” said CEO David Maher Roberts. (TheNextWeb)

-- Live365’s motion for a preliminary injunction against the Copyright Royalty Board was denied last week. The webcasting company had sought to stop the CRB’s proceedings by challenging the constitutionality of the process that appoints the three judges on the panel. While the judge rejected the preliminary injunction, he noted the appointments clause is “essentially a gray area” due to the “limited guidance the Framers of the Constitution provide.” The CRB sets webcasting rates and is currently determining rates for the years 2011 to 2015. (The Blog of Legal Times)

-- Chris Walla of Death Cab For Cutie has started his own label, Trans. The imprint is part of Warner Music Group’s Independent Label Group. The Lonely Forest is the label’s first signing. (Pitchfork)