Parlophone/EMI's "virtual band" Gorillaz maintains its perfect record on Billboard's European Albums chart, scoring its third No. 1 from three studio releases with "Plastic Beach." On European Hot 100 Singles, meanwhile, Ke$ha's "Tik Tok" (RCA/Sony Music Entertainment) returns to the top for the sixth aggregate week.

The Gorillaz self-titled 2001 debut album climbed to the top of the pan-European chart in its 21st week that summer. The 2005 follow-up "Demon Days" made much shorter work of the challenge, starting at No. 1 in June, 2005, and now "Plastic Beach" repeats the feat, opening at the summit in Denmark and Austria and climbing 12-1 in the Belgian region of Flanders.

"Beach" is also new at No. 2 in the United Kingdom (with sales of 74,000), France and Switzerland, No. 3 in Germany, No. 4 in Ireland, No. 5 in the Czech Republic, No. 6 in Portugal and Norway and No. 8 in Holland, climbing 9-2 in Wallony.

Europe's best-selling album of the last four weeks, Sade's "Soldier of Love" (Epic/Sony Music Entertainment), thus falls to No. 2, losing its crown in France, Hungary and the Czech Republic, although it posts a 7-6 climb in Germany and holds at No. 2 in Poland.

There's a confident No. 3 debut overall for Amy Macdonald's sophomore album "A Curious Thing" (Mercury/Universal). The Scottish singer-songwriter's debut set "This Is The Life" sold 3 million copies worldwide, according to the label, and the new one makes a fast start in her European strongholds. It begins at No. 1 in Switzerland, No. 2 in Holland, No. 6 in the Czech Republic, and climbs 8-2 in Flanders and 8-4 in Wallony. In the United Kingdom, where "Life" has sold 762,000, the sequel bows at No. 4 on sales of 42,000.

Lady Gaga is down 2-4 on European Albums with "The Fame" (Interscope/Universal), despite an 8-7 climb in France. The subsequent EP "The Fame Monster" is up 32-25 after climbing 10-4 in Sweden, 22-10 in Flanders and 13-10 in Wallony.

"Valleys of Neptune" (Legacy/Columbia/Sony Music Entertainment), the album of recordings started in 1969 by Jimi Hendrix and now marketed as a "new" release 40 years after his death, debuts at No. 5 on the pan-European chart. Its best starts are at No. 3 in the Czech Republic and No. 4 in Holland, but it also makes top ten arrivals at No. 6 in France, Italy and Austria, No. 8 in Switzerland and No. 10 in Portugal. It climbs 20-6 and 16-7 in Flanders and Wallony respectively and opens at No. 21 in the United Kingdom on sales of 14,000. Hendrix's last week in the top 75 chart there was in March 2003, at the end of an aggregate 13-week run for the "Voodoo Child" collection.

All but one of the remaining titles in the Europe-wide album top ten are in decline: Alicia Keys' "The Element of Freedom" (J/Sony Music Entertainment) 5-6; Black Eyed Peas' "The E.N.D. (The Energy Never Dies)" (Interscope/Universal) 6-7; Johnny Cash's "American VI: Ain't No Grave" (American/Lost Highway/Universal) 3-8; and Unheilig's "Grosse Freiheit" (Universal) 7-10.

But there's a new entry at No. 9 for reunited Irish "boy band" Boyzone's "Brother" (Polydor/Universal), dedicated to the memory of former member Stephen Gately, who died last October. It sells 101,000 for a No. 1 start in the United Kingdom, also opening at No. 1 in Ireland, where the single "Gave It All Away" was No. 1 last week.

Ke$ha regains the European Hot 100 Singles top spot as it climbs back 2-1 in Switzerland, spends another week at the top in Austria, and moves 4-2 in Germany and 7-3 in Italy. The track is still in the U.K. top 40, at No. 38, after 19 weeks, as she debuts at No. 22 there with "Blah Blah Blah" featuring 3OH!3.

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