-- Filmmaker and academic Kembrew McLeod, one of the creators of the music copyright documentary Copyright Criminals, is co-author of a book coming out next year titled Creative License about the law and culture of digital sampling. One of the authors' findings is about the cost of clearing the samples in a hip-hop classic. "We asked what would it would cost at today's rates to clear the audio fragments that make up Public Enemy's classic 1990 album 'Fear of a Black Planet.' We crunched the numbers, and in our conservative estimate the group would lose roughly five dollars per album. That's a loss of five million dollars on a platinum record!" (The Atlantic, via String Theory Media)

-- Artists can now allow consumers to name their own prices for physical product at their Bandcamp pages. Previously, Bandcamp allowed this function for digital downloads. Given the near-costless nature of copying and distribution digital files, the name-your-price feature makes sense for digital. Because physical product is finite and more costly, artists will have to be careful where they set they set the minimum price. Even so, what has worked well as a digital pricing tactic could work well for physical, too. Keep in mind that artists can set whatever minimum price they want for both digital and physical. Bandcamp allows buyers to go as high as they'd like. So, artists enjoy potentially unlimited upside but establish a floor on the downside. (Bandcamp blog)

-- Guvera, the ad-supported download site that launched in the U.S. on Tuesday, announced on Thursday a licensing agreement with ASCAP. Why a deal with a performing rights organization? Guvera offers a limited number of DRM-free downloads, which do not require such a license, but it also allows users to stream songs, which does require a performance license. Read Billboard.biz's first-look post at Guvera. (Press release)