Hispanics are the most upbeat when it comes to the prospects of an economic recovery, per a new report from Ipsos and Telemundo.

The poll, released today, found that four out of five Hispanics "feel that the economy has stabilized or that it has already started to improve." Ipsos and Telemundo, an NBC Universal-owned property, conducted the survey via telephone interviews with 500 Hispanic consumers, age 18 and older, in the U.S.

The report comes as marketers and consumers test the waters following the severe recession that began in December 2007. Though consumer confidence is rebounding, per a recent The Conference Board report, the vast majority of Americans are still pinching pennies and grappling with unemployment, stalling the pace of overall growth.

Among those Hispanics surveyed, 14 percent said the U.S. economy "has turned the corner on the economic crisis," with 63 percent, meanwhile, stating that the economy hasn't begun recovering, but that it's stabilized. Twenty percent, on the other hand, said, "the worst is yet to come."

Corresponding figures for the rest of the U.S. population are 11, 55 and 31 percent, per a separate poll conducted by Ipsos, in partnership with McClatchy. In both surveys, 3 percent of Americans said they simply "weren't sure."

A larger percentage of Hispanic women (68 percent) compared to men said the U.S. economy has stabilized, though it had yet to improve.

Another indicator? Companies like Colgate-Palmolive, Kimberly-Clark, PepsiCo and Hershey are scheduled to report earnings tomorrow, and analysts will be closely watching to see if consumer confidence has indeed rebounded.