-- One side note about We7’s announcement that it was able to cover all costs for its on-demand streaming from advertising on the site. Not to take away from the company’s success – because so many before it have failed – but a digital music company has more expenses than royalties owed to rights holders. (Obviously, things like marketing, salaries, network costs and salaries) We7 has achieved a basic level of subsistence, not profitability. In any case, its achievement is worth celebrating as an important milestone on the road to sustainable profits in digital music. (Billboard.biz)

-- Rhino Records – the LA record store, not the record label – will briefly reappear as a pop-up store from May 17 to 31 near its original location on Hollywood Boulevard. Proceeds will be given to a local not-for-profit. The store’s founder, Richard Foos, is behind the reopening. Foos is now the CEO of Shout! Factory. The store closed in 2006 after 25 years in business. (Variety)

-- One of Spotify’s new features pushes the super-hyped music service into a much-needed future: users can now add personal tracks to Spotify’s catalog of licensed songs. Why the big deal? Those people whose interests are covered by only licensable songs won’t notice. But for people who regularly listen to unreleased songs, totally independent artists, illegal mashups and/or out-of-print releases, Spotify’s new update will mean all music, not just what is saleable and up for licenses, can be played through a single application. Those people are the very types of early adopting, heavy users who are likely to have interest in a service like Spotify. It could have millions of tracks, but Spotify has enough holes to require using a standard media player like iTunes for everything not in its collection. The ability to use a single application to enjoy all music is a problem that needed to be solved. Lala does a fairly good job at uploading personal tracks and integrating them with a user’s online collection. Two asterisks, though. First, Spotify has not said if there is a limit on the size of uploaded files. It makes a difference. Lala, for example, does not upload lengthy, single-track DJ mixes. Second, as is the case with Lala, there could be metadata issues that complicate the uploading of some tracks. (Billboard.biz)

-- A proposed convention center expansion could threaten the Live Nation-owned Fillmore Miami Beach. (Miami Herald)

-- Atlantic Records and Jim Beam Bourbon have put together a promotion to get some unreleased Kid Rock tracks to his fans. An unreleased track, “Times Like These,” and recordings from two 2009 concerts at Detroit’s Comerica Park will be available through purchase of Jim Beam gift cartons. (Press release)