-- TuneCore has a marketing partnership with MySpace Music that will get MySpace Music-registered artists – which is just about everybody – a 50% discount on TuneCore distribution. That drops the fee for an album sold in 19 stores to $23.49. In addition, MySpace Music will provide TuneCore clients with $50 in MyAds credits so they can advertise themselves on MySpace. In the future – no specific date was given – MySpace artists will be able to log into TuneCore with their MySpace user IDs. (TuneCore.com)

-- “Some in the music industry may question the economic impact of cloud music, but I think it's a great opportunity to turn every device into a vending machine,” writes Michael Robertson of the Amazon.com icon that is pre-installed on Android phones. Once uploaded, MP3Tunes’ Android app can wirelessly sync the song to the user’s in-the-cloud music locker. The humorous title of the post is “A Billion Taco Vending Machines = Bigger Taco Industry.” In the opening paragraph, Michael argues the taco industry would greatly benefit from taco machines on every street corner. Similarly, he thinks the music industry will benefit when there are music vending machines on every street corner. Ease of use is the key. Just as vending machines are easy to use, music services must be dead-simple to use. “Music is such a spur-of-the-moment emotional experience that if people hear a song and can get it with one click, they will (if it's easy),” he writes. (Michael’s Minute)

-- Another twist regarding the acquisition of The Pirate Bay has emerged. Hans Pandeya announced he has purchased the Swedish BitTorrent tracking site for $10 million. The Pirate Bay folks deny it has been sold. What we do know is Pandeya now lives in Boston and has acquired the OTC Bulletin Board-traded Business Marketing Solutions, which issued a press release saying it had acquired The Pirate Bay. In any case, the only sure bet is that Pandeya will never turn The Pirate Bay into a revolutionary and legal business. (CNET)

-- When HP acquired Palm, it allowed an exit for media and technology private equity firm Elevation Partners. U2’s Bono is a managing director and co-founder of the firm. One estimate by PEHub puts the Elevation’s gain at $25 million on an investment of $460 million – a 5% return. Yelp, Fortune (in which it is a minority shareholder), SDI Media and Move (formerly Homestore, Inc.) are in the company’s current portfolio. (VentureBeat)

-- In case you want a more thorough look at Guvera, you can watch a video at YouTube with executive interviews, news clips and screen shots. (YouTube)

-- Among the items in a list of “Ten Reasons Fans Don’t Buy Your Merch” is this: “Your manager (smaller acts) has too much pride to be hawking merchandise.” I can’t count the times I’ve stood at an unmanned merch table at small venues. You can’t sell it if nobody selling. Here’s another good one: “The lead singer refuses to promote merch.” Most bands are clearly uncomfortable selling merch and at best give the token “we’ve got merch for sale in the back” disclaimer. The list is missing the biggest single reason fans don’t buy your merch: too few bands treat merchandise like an actual business. Instead, they assume people are going to walk in the shop because they the “open” sign in the window. (Music Think Tank)

-- Pandora has partnered with Brita (which makes water filtration products), Nalgene (maker of plastic water bottles) and the Dave Matthews Band for the FilterForGood campaign. A special Pandora page at Pandora.com/DaveMatthewsBand has three videos with interviews with Matthews on the steps he takes to reduce waste on his tours. The page also has tour dates and a link to the Dave Matthews Band Mixtape Pandora station. Brita and Nalgene’s FilterForGood campaign has also worked with Lady Antebellum and Ben Harper and Relentless7.