Jon Bon Jovi And Jack White: Are They Really That Different, When It Comes To Loving Vinyl And Hating Steve Jobs?
Jon Bon Jovi And Jack White: Are They Really That Different, When It Comes To Loving Vinyl And Hating Steve Jobs?

Jon Bon Jovi Jack White

Jon Bon Jovi has drawn the ire of technologists, the tech media and Apple customers around the world -- all for giving a nostalgic opinion in an.

Really, can't we all get along? Digital music is great for music fans and consumers: There's more choice, more information, more (and easier) discovery and fewer dollars spent -- and you can't beat the instant gratification. And Jon, if you're looking for great records with amazing packaging, head down to White's Third Man Record Store in Nashville, or check out Third Man's Rolling Record Store at South by Southwest this week. Or even order vinyl online!

What's gotten obscured in Bon Jovi's sepia-toned reminiscing about the vinyl age is this point: That the Internet has not been good to the business model of music, which, yes, includes money-grubbing capitalists but also includes artists themselves trying to make a living, not to mention the lost art of artist development, when musicians were given the time and budgets to develop (indeed, Bon Jovi himself didn't become a star until his third album). Like many other artists, he may be concerned that record labels, the vehicle that drives most artist development, have not found a workable business model to replace the old one. And he may be looking at the results -- like the 360 deal -- and thinking that artists in his day had it better.

There, Bon Jovi actually has some evidence to back up his opinion.