Marty Lewis, a veteran record producer, engineer and mixer whom Jimmy Buffett referred to as the "Sound Sculptor," died April 27 while swimming in the Sea of Cortez in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. He was 60.

Lewis enjoyed a fruitful collaboration with the late Dan Fogelberg and also worked with such acts as the Ozark Mountain Daredevils, Rita Coolidge, Asleep at the Wheel and the Charlie Daniels Band.

For the freewheeling Buffett, Lewis engineered such hits as "Margaritaville," "Cheeseburger in Paradise" and "Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes." His work with Buffett led to a meeting with Fogelberg, and he worked his way up from mix down engineer and assistant engineer on the "Nether Lands" album to producing the Fogelberg hits "Leader of the Band," "Longer," "Same Old Lang Syne" and "Run for the Roses."

Lewis worked on six studio albums with the singer-songwriter, four of which went multi-platinum.

Born Dec. 28, 1950, in the Detroit suburb of Oak Park, Mich., Lewis at age 14 was the youngest member of the one-hit wonders the Shy Guys. With Lewis on bass, they released three 45rpm records, had the local hit "We Gotta Go" and backed up the Dave Clark Five at Cobo Hall in Detroit.

Later, Lewis spent time in England and San Francisco, playing with the group RJ Fox and producing and engineering for Morningstar, Druick & Lorange and others. He wound up in Nashville and worked with the Ozark Mountain Daredevils on their 1975 hit "Jackie Blue," which reached No. 3 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Lewis lived on the coast of Northern Oregon, outside Detroit and in Cabo San Lucas.

Survivors include his son Corey Lewis and his wife Jessica Huebsch; his partner Libby August; his mother Betty G. Lewis; his sister Lori Lewis and her husband Peter Morris; his brother Keith H. Lewis and his wife Jennifer; and his nieces and nephews Amy and Dylan Morris and Mia and Jack Lewis.