-- S1 Songs has acquired the catalogs, and futures, of songwriters Brett Beavers, Shaye Smith and Don Rollins and an interest in “Whiskey Lullaby” by Brad Paisley and “It’s Five O’Clock Somewhere” by Alan Jackson. (Music Row)

-- Opposition to the Performance Royalties Act claim they have signed on a majority of the House of Representatives to a non-binding, anti-royalty resolution. The Local Radio Freedom Act now has 220 supporters. The House Judiciary Committee approved the Performance Royalties Act last month. (Radio Ink)

-- New York Buzz has an interview with Billboard’s editorial director, Bill Werde. About Billboard.com: “On July 15, we’re re-launching the site and I think we’re really going to change the way people define the music experience in terms of charting. I think everyone knows the Billboard charts, right? But I think we’re gonna change people’s definitions of what that really means. We’re gonna make those charts experiential.” (New York Buzz)

-- Ted Cohen on the attention surrounding Spotify: It’s free, it’s simple to use, it plays fast (meaning no buffering time), it has a complete library and it didn’t come from Apple. But do consumers really “want it all,” as Cohen put it? Collectively, consumers want a small percentage of the music that exists. Individually, a typical person tends to listen to a small group of songs over and over. Nobody plans to access every song in Spotify’s catalog, but they enjoy the freedom that comes with that option. Ultimately, one should not ignore the dust that gathers on MP3 collections and the typical consumers’ lack of adventurousness. (MidemNet Blog)

-- The managing director at Sony Music Entertainment Middle East estimates over half of the legitimate record store closings in Saudi Arabia are due to online and physical piracy. Digital retail is in its infancy there. iTunes does not operate in Saudi Arabia. Digital media site Getmo Arabia is the first to move into the music download market. (ArabianBusiness.com)