-- To follow live updates of the Jammie Thomas file-sharing case that started at 9am CT, follow the Twitter feeds of Copyright & Campaign's Ben Sheffner and Marc Bourgeois, and/or follow the #riaa hash tag.

-- Live Nation is offering some lawn tickets as a one-price, no-fee bundle for this week's "No Service Fee Wednesday" sale. Some of those fees are facility fees, which may or may not be charged at a particular venue. The all-inclusive ticket price is something the concert promoter said it would do since it launched its own ticketing service. The irony here, of course, is that one price hides the details that consumers should desire. While consumers don't like paying fees, breaking out the various fees at least lets people know what they're paying for. Is it better to pay $15 for a ticket and $10 in fees, or $25 for the bundle? There's no practical difference, but consumers prefer the one-price bundle. (AP)

-- The low broadband penetration rate to core country music fans' homes is both a blessing and a curse. The Washington Post takes a look at how it is a curse by citing statistics from a recent CMA consumer study and talking with Nashville executives. Only 50% of core country fans, the study found, have Internet access at home. That certainly reduced the effectiveness of Internet marketing. But there are some strangely positive aspects to all this. Once more country fans go digital, they'll buy fewer albums and more individual tracks - that means revenue will fall sharply. (The study found country labels get two-thirds of their revenue from CD-dominant buyers.) Once that happens, the few physical retailers that represent a majority of country sales will experience some unpleasant inventory shocks that could have negative repercussions for all genres. Country labels won't live on CD revenues forever, and they need to prepare for the digital transition, but they've been fortunate to sell so many CDs (and albums) this far into the decade. (Washington Post)

-- CMA Music Fest attendance was up 7.2% this year - down 3% in four-day ticket sales but up 19.5% in single-day ticket sales. Attendance for the free Riverfront Park shows and nightly LP Field shows average 56,000 per day. (The Tennessean)

-- A report says Ticketmaster's echo division will shut down the web sites of between 100 and 200 clients between June 15 and June 18. "Echo employees have been working overtime to walk clients through a seven-step process that will put them in a position to re-build their websites elsewhere. Those clients are on their own for the unanticipated costs of the changeover, which run from a few thousand dollars up to $10,000 or more. Moreover, the investments clients made in their echo sites, which are regarded as among the more expensive in the local market, as well as their monthly maintenance and hosting fee (averaging $300/month but running up to $1,000/month), are said to be unrecoverable." (String Theory Media, via Music Row)

-- Australia is getting a new, locally developed music format, the DDA album. The albums are sold on branded USB memory sticks that contain DRM-free files and grant the ability to access additional content. "People who buy the albums register with an online locker system that not only makes a back-up of the songs - which can then be accessed from any other computer or mobile phone - but also provides access to a swathe of bonus content provided by the artist on an ongoing basis such as photos, videos, lyrics, artwork, new tracks and even concert tickets." (WAtoday.com)