-- Chris Anderson talked about the "coat-tailing" critics of his book "The Long Tail" at the Commonwealth Club on September 23. "The academics are wrong," he told the audience. "They're just confused. They're confused because they tend to apply a standard percentile analysis." What he's talking about can be best described by the 80/20 rule, where 80% of sales come from 20% of products. Anderson refuses to acknowledge the merits of academic research that use this sort of relative analysis. That's because the number of unique titles that comprise 20% of all titles grows as the number of titles grows. And in recent years, the number of albums has grown sharply. He wants the research to deal in absolute numbers. "We are spreading our choice more widely," he insisted. "We are experiencing a more diverse world. The academics who build a cottage industry in coat=tailing on pop economic theories I guess had to find something to say so they get their statistics wrong." (Fora.tv)

-- Perez Hilton secured a label venture with Warner Music Group based on his track record for being a music tastemaker. His first "Perez Presents" tour, however, came and went without much attention. From Reuters: "The trek drew modest crowds, and tickets for some of the all-ages gigs were given away. Tickets for the Hollywood show could be bought at the window for $25, down from the advertised day-of-sale rate of $31... It also passed under the radar of the music industry, whose denizens are neither enamored of Hilton's day job nor thrilled that he landed his own label at Warner Music Group." (Reuters' Fan Fare blog)

-- Since a jury assessed a $1.9-million in damages in the trials of Jammie Thomas-Rasset and Joel Tenenbaum, there has been healthy debate about the constitutionality of the level of damages. In a new case, Verizon California Inc., v. OnlineNIC, the judge upheld the court's award and dismissed the argument the award should be reduced under BMW v Gore (which addressed whether or not excessively high punitive damages violate the Constitution). Wrote Ben Sheffner: "Of course, the Verizon case from the Northern District of California is not binding on Judge Davis (of the Thomas-Rasset trial), or on Judge Nancy Gertner in Tenenbaum's case, and they are free to ignore it. But the more cases piling up that reject the application of BMW to statutory damages, the harder it becomes for the defendants to convince the courts that existing law supports their position." (Copyrights & Campaigns)

-- Free music abounds outside of file-sharing. In many cases - some highly publicized and some not - the artist has decided when and where the music is given away. In the case of Mojo Nixon and a promotion with the Orchard, the no-cost release of a new album and about 150 songs from his catalog carries with it the value of awareness. The catalog titles will receive placement at Amazon.com's MP3 store. No details were given on the length of time for the free giveaways. (Digital Music News)

-- Rhapsody says its iPhone app has been downloaded 200,000 times and the Android version will be out by the end of the year. (mocoNews)

-- The more the music industry changes, the more it stays the same. Case in point: Gretchen Wilson has launched her own record label, Redneck Records, and has the standard pieces in place. Label operations will be supported by her team at Front Line's Morris Artist Management (management companies performing label tasks is a relatively new wrinkle in the equation). The label has inked a deal with Sony Music's RED Distribution. It has a radio promotion consultant and a PR company. (Music Row)

-- In his post about digital developments in the book publishing industry, David Pakman (of Venrock Associates, former CEO at eMusic) has advice both brief and important: lower your costs. It's pointed at the publishing industry but applies to music companies as well. "The digital future for all media companies is likely a smaller market with inferior economics than the monopoly physical one they enjoyed for decades. To survive in this new world will require lower cost structures. But the result of not embracing this future are clear: just ask the music industry." (Pakman's Blog: Disruption)

-- Go here for a live webcast of panels and discussions from the Future of Music Summit in Washington DC.