Morning Fix: How Fred Armisen and The Clash Got Together for an Internet Video; Lorde Continues Reign Over the Hot 100; Telefonica and Rhapsody Team Up for International Play

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HOW THE CLASH TEAMED WITH FRED ARMISEN (IAN RUBBISH), FUNNY OR DIE TO PROMOTE NEW SONY LEGACY BOXSET

Ian Rubbish, a British punk character Fred Armisen introduced in his last season on “Saturday Night Live” this past spring, has teamed up with The Clash’s Mick Jones and Paul Simonon in a new video for Funny Or Die. The six-minute clip, called "The Last Gang In Town," was filmed at New York’s Electric Lady Studios, where The Clash recorded iconic albums like “Sandinista!” and “Combat Rock."  
Billboard.biz


LORDE'S 'ROYALS' RULES HOT 100 FOR THIRD WEEK

"Royals" crowns the subscription services-based On-Demand Songs chart with 2.8 million on-demand U.S. streams, according to Nielsen BDS (up 1%). The activity helps keep the cut at its No. 3 peak to date on the overall Streaming Songs chart (8 million U.S. streams, up 5%). 
Billboard.biz


MOBILE GIANT TELEFÓNICA TAKES STAKE IN RHAPSODY INTERNATIONAL

In a deal that has the potential to rapidly expand its global footprint, mobile giant Telefónica will take an undisclosed stake in Rhapsody International, a wholly owned subsidiary of U.S.-based music subscription service Rhapsody.  As a result, Napster, Rhapsody's brand outside of the United States, has an opportunity to grow in Europe and Latin America.
Billboard.biz


MYSPACE LAUNCHES 'PORTFOLIO' ARTIST FEATURE, MUSOS FRONT AD CAMPAIGN: WATCH

Called Portfolio, the new feature will allow users to promote 10 to 31 items of their original work, be it a photo, a video, an animated GIF or a new song, in one horizontal page. Portfolio will be available on Myspace desktop, and viewable on the mobile web and mobile app for iPhones iOS 6 and above. 
Billboard.biz


BUSINESS MATTERS: MUSIC DISCOVERY THROUGH ADVERTISING

Brands that funded radio stations and shows have long helped people hear new music. Now there are new digital products that allow music to enhance brand advertising. The kicker is they could also help time-starved consumers discover new music.
Billboard.biz


LUSCIOUS JACKSON RETURN AFTER 14 YEARS THANKS TO THE CROWD (AND PLEDGEMUSIC)

A few years ago, Cunniff and Glaser began collaborating on a children's album, but nothing came of it, largely due to distribution issues. But last year, the trio learned about new options to fund and distribute music, and the band's fourth album, "Magic Hour," is due Nov. 5 on its own City Song imprint, followed by a children's album on Nov. 19.   
Billboard.biz


VAN HALEN SUES DRUMMER'S EX-WIFE FOR USING FAMOUS LAST NAME

When famous people marry, their spouses often take on a famous last name. That benefit can even survive divorce. But can it be used as a commercial asset? Witness a new lawsuit by ELVH Inc., which is the intellectual property holding company of the world-famous rock band Van Halen.   
Billboard.biz


NEW MUSIC HALL OF FAME MUSEUM IN LONDON TO FEATURE FREDDIE MERCURY AND JOHN LENNON HOLOGRAMS

A new museum, called The Music Hall of Fame, is set to open in Camden, London next year, and will feature interactive holograms of a number of living and dead music stars.
NME


HMV STAGES COMEBACK WITH LAUNCH OF DIGITAL DOWNLOAD SERVICE AND APPS

The announcement follows the reopening of the HMV flagship Oxford Street store a few weeks ago and see the brand launch iOS and Android apps to tempt mobile users into purchasing music through the service while on the go.
Wired


MORRISSEY OPENS UP IN AUTOBIOGRAPHY

Former Smiths singer Morrissey has used his autobiography to criticise the UK legal system and music business; and revealed his first full relationship came with a man when he was in his 30s.
BBC



THE YEAR ONYX'S 'SLAM' CRASHED POP RADIO

This year marks the 20th anniversary of a remarkable year in hip-hop. Over the 12 months of 1993, , De La Soul, Salt 'n' Pepa, Snoop Dogg, A Tribe Called Quest, the and more than a dozen other rap artists released or promoted albums that helped to change the sound of America.
NPR



WHOSE BUSINESS MODEL IS TO BLAME FOR INTERNET PIRACY?

ICYMI, there’s been a hot controversy for the past couple of days about claims made by Mercatus Center researcher Jerry Brito and Washington Post blogger Tim Lee to the effect that Hollywood is responsible for Internet piracy because it doesn’t make newly released movies available for legitimate purchase or rental right away. As Lee put it in a Tweet: “Hollywood should blame itself for its piracy problems.”
High Tech Forum


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