Sean Ross

Contributing Columnist

 

Ross On Radio: Why Radio Shouldn't Be More Like "Anchorman 2"

Ross On Radio: Why Radio Shouldn't Be More Like "Anchorman 2"

For the first month or so of the relentless promotion for "Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues," I was feeling a little wistful about radio's inability to be as funny or creative in its promotional efforts. Then as the Ron Burgundy appearances became more relentless, the reaction changed and various tweets and Facebook postings began reading the promotion as desperate. In that regard, "Anchorman 2" now resembles another one of radio's self-promotion campaigns.
Ross On Radio: Fresh Listen - Q102 Cincinnati

Ross On Radio: Fresh Listen - Q102 Cincinnati

Acoustic pop and alternative crossovers often pile up at top 40 waiting for the one "rock slot" among more traditionally rhythmic and mainstream titles. That's why One Direction's "Story Of My Life" needs five weeks to get to the top 20 and OneRepublic's "Counting Stars" needs six months. So what would top 40 sound like if it played those songs right away? A lot like WKRQ (Q102) Cincinnati. So we take a Fresh Listen.
Ross On Radio: Radio Now Sells Music, But Who's Buying?

Ross On Radio: Radio Now Sells Music, But Who's Buying?

For years, radio was emphatically not in the business of selling records. Now, major broadcasters have launched various label/artist initiatives and pre-release specials of superstar albums have become a regular part of the landscape. But how can radio sell records at a time when an increasing number of listeners are choosing to stream, not buy? We have some thoughts.
Ross On Radio: Top 40's Fall Checkup, Part II

Ross On Radio: Top 40's Fall Checkup, Part II

With readers divided on the state of top 40, our look at the format's vital signs continues. And while there are few signs of an early '90s-style collapse, we may be facing a true doldrums this time.
Ross On Radio: Top 40's Fall Checkup, Part I

Ross On Radio: Top 40's Fall Checkup, Part I

This week, one Ross On Radio listener tweeted that he felt the format was going into a downturn. Another wrote to remark that the format had seemed to miss its once-customary early-decade doldrums. So it seemed like a good time to take a look at the format's health, from ratings to available product. Here's part one.
Ross On Radio: Staying In The Continuous Music Business

Ross On Radio: Staying In The Continuous Music Business

With radio's renewed emphasis on "live and local" as its franchise in a world of proliferating audio choices comes the tacit suggestion that broadcasters may have to get out of the "continuous music" business, rather than offer a spot load competitive with today's new offerings. That would be a shame, because nobody knows more about playing "continuous music" than radio.

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