Phyllis Stark

Nashville-based writer

Anatomy of a Hit: Craig Campbell’s ‘Outta My Head’

Anatomy of a Hit: Craig Campbell’s ‘Outta My Head’

A single’s chart history is measured in weeks and milestones, but never in beards. So when Craig Campbell’s “Outta My Head” began what ultimately became a marathon journey up the Country Airplay chart, it was funny -- at first -- when one of the song’s writers, Brandon Kinney.
Country Labels Revive Two Forgotten Arts: Artist Development—And Patience

Country Labels Revive Two Forgotten Arts: Artist Development—And Patience

There are still periodic examples of record companies going one and done with an artist—as in, dropping them from the roster after just one failed single. But country music labels notably appear to more often to be playing the long game of late, giving such artists as Brett Eldredge, Tyler Farr, Thomas Rhett and Eric Paslay multiple chances to ultimately succeed.
Anatomy Of A Hit: Tyler Farr’s ‘Redneck Crazy’

Anatomy Of A Hit: Tyler Farr’s ‘Redneck Crazy’

Tyler Farr's recent top five country hit "Redneck Crazy" may have stirred up some controversy, but it's just the kind of controversy that sells records. Here's a look at how the Columbia Records promotion team made the song a hit, despite some challenges along the way.
Country Music’s Dearth of Females Extends Well Beyond the Artists

Country Music’s Dearth of Females Extends Well Beyond the Artists

Much ado has been made in the consumer press lately about country music’s female troubles. While format insiders know this is an issue that pops up—to varying degrees—about every five years or so, critics have been wound up over the fact that country radio is so light on women right now, and particularly female solo acts. But the lack of females in country music goes well beyond artist rosters.
40 Music Dads With Their Famous Kids

Keith, Jennings, Nelson: Second-Generation Performers Making Their Own Way In Country Music

If you consider Jon Bon Jovi to be an uncle, you fell asleep every night to live music being played in your living room or performed onstage with a parent when you were barely out of training pants, you may have all the makings of a second-generation star. For a growing handful of young country music hopefuls, these were the experiences that shaped their childhoods.

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