Little's known about this group, even though their sole album, 1971's One Voice Many, came out on a major label, Columbia. Sounding more like a record from the late '60s than the early '70s, its folk-rock-psychedelic blend was unusual for prominently featuring the autoharp of Angel Autoharp (as she's billed on the record), which sometimes functioned much as a lead guitar or organ would within a rock lineup. Autoharp also wrote the material on the LP, which presented both instrumentals (on which the autoharp took its strongest role) and vocal numbers with male-female vocal blends/alternations, all the while maintaining a slightly haunting yet cheery flavor consistent with the sound of many Californian bands of the era. ~ Richie Unterberger, Rovi