The Nightcrawlers had a small hit, "The Little Black Egg," in the mid-'60s that's remembered for its cutesy folk-rock-cum-garage sound and its enigmatic lyrics. Although it only reached number 85, it made more of an impact than that low placing might reflect, since it was a regional hit in various parts of the country after it was recorded in 1965, only making the national charts upon its third issue in early 1967. The Nightcrawlers did a few more singles with their original lineup, which disbanded in mid-1966 with enough material for one LP on Kapp. A different Nightcrawlers did keep going for one more single in 1967 and principal songwriter Charlie Conlon did a couple of singles as leader of a different band called Conlon and the Nightcrawlers. For the most part, the Nightcrawlers favored a sparse folk-rock sound that comes off as a poor person's Beau Brummels.
The Nightcrawlers were formed in Daytona Beach, FL, in the mid-'60s and along with the Birdwatchers and We the People, were one of the most regionally popular Florida rock groups of that era. Conlon's original material showed a Byrds/Beau Brummels influence in the folky guitar riffs, minor melodies, and introspective lyrics, but weren't nearly as skilled or developed as those groups were. Conlon actually left the band in spring 1966 and the Nightcrawlers broke up a few months later, although two of the members formed a different lineup of the Nightcrawlers that did one more single for Kapp, "My Butterfly." That 45 was Who-lite, not very similar to the old garage-folk-rock Nightcrawlers and in spite of that, was their best song other than "The Little Black Egg." They never recorded after 1967, but different lineups with the Nightcrawlers name continued to perform until 1970. ~ Richie Unterberger, Rovi