CMJ: Andrew W.K. Video Q&A
Andrew Strasser

The second full day of CMJ on Wednesday (Oct. 21) in New York yielded a slew of panels and shows, foremost among them an audience with Andrew W.K. Who better to get the ball rolling than the hardest partier known to man? After a brief introduction by CMJ honcho Moose, W.K. came out and took a crack at some jokes before stretching, then methodically dismembered a chair that sat onstage by putting a one of its leg in his mouth, gagging, wrestling the chair to the ground, ripping the seat off and heaving the pieces across the stage before opening his panel discussion to questions.

Video Above: Andrew W.K. tells Billboard.com his party philosophy.

Over the next hour, W.K. elaborated on his positive life philosophy while answering questions from audience members, including a pair of die-hard fans that dressed up like Andrew W.K. and drove to New York from Indiana, not necessarily in that order. One of look-a-likes asked WK to tattoo him, and an eager Andrew asked for a tattoo needle.

Video Above: Andrew W.K. muses on his recent NYC piano battle with Chilly Gonzales

After closing with a solo piano version of "Party Hard," look-a-likes head banging along, Andrew W.K. offered some insight into his sleep schedule, compared his sleeping habits to that of Donald Trump.

Video Above: Andrew W.K. talks about his sleep patterns.

Elsewhere on night two of CMJ, Glassnote Records newest signee's Mumford & Sons performed a set to a capacity crowd at White Rabbit. The West London quartet played a rousing set of folk tunes and four part harmonies. The British accents were incongruous with the bluegrass feel of their music.

Meanwhile, the Fool's Gold Showcase at 88 Palace celebrated not only the label's second anniversary but also the new signings of Donnis and The Suzan, a four-piece Tokyo based girl band. After DJ Sammy Bananas and the Bay Area based Honor Roll crew featuring Trackademicks warmed up the crowd, The Suzan stormed through their set, throwing a bird whistle, keyboards, maracas and tambourines over a heavy groove of drums and bass, accented by shrill vocals and numerous clap alongs.

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