Phish's Mike Gordon and Page McConnell, Bootsy Collins, and others join Gov't Mule album sessions . . . Collection of unreleased Modest Mouse tracks due on K Records in April . . . Opera conductor Sar

Updating a story from earlier this week, Phish's Mike Gordon and Page McConnell, Bootsy Collins, Larry Graham, Widespread Panic's Dave Schools, Hot Tuna pianist Peat Sears, Zen Tricksters' keyboardist Rob Barraco, and storied mandolin player David Grisman have all committed to taking part in the upcoming Gov't Mule album.



As previously reported, the set will be a tribute to the Warren Haynes-led band's late bassist Allen Woody, and will include a cast of his favorite bass players.









On the heels of last year's archival compilation "Building Nothing Out Of Something" (Up), K Records will issue "Sad Sappy Sucker," a 23-track collection of unreleased Modest Mouse tracks in April. The material dates back to 1994-95, and was recorded by Dub Narcotic's Calvin Johnson at his Dub Narcotic Studios.



Modest Mouse's Epic debut, "The Moon & Antarctica," bowed at No. 5 on Billboard's Heatseekers chart last June and has sold nearly 74,000 copies in the U.S., according to SoundScan. "Building Nothing Out Of Something" debuted at No. 13 on Billboard's Top Independent Albums tally last February.









Opera conductor Sarah Caldwell, 76, is listed in stable condition at Washington Regional Medical Center in Fayetteville, a hospital spokesperson said, but would not say when or why Caldwell was admitted.



A director and conductor hailed as opera's first lady, Caldwell is best known as the founder of the Boston Opera Company. She joined the University of Arkansas in the fall of 1999 and holds the title of distinguished professor of music.



Caldwell received the 1996 National Medal of Arts and is credited with making opera more appealing to a wider American audience. She also is considered a pioneer for women in her field. In 1976, she was the first woman to conduct at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City.



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Copyright 2001 Billboard.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. AP contributed to this report.









Guitarist Bryan Gregory of the Cramps, a band that helped to launch the punk music revolution, has died at the age of 46. Gregory, a native of Detroit, died Wednesday. A cause of death was not immediately available. The guitarist had recently suffered a heart attack and had been ill for several weeks.



The Cramps made their debut in 1976 at the legendary punk rock club CBGB's in New York. Gregory was known for his wild antics on stage and his distinctive black hair with a lock of white hanging over his eye. The band released two albums, "Gravest Hits" in 1979 and "Songs the Lord Taught Us" in 1980. After leaving the Cramps, Gregory performed with the band Beast from 1980 to 1984, and with the Dials from 1992 to 1995. He had recently formed a new band called Shiver.



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Copyright 2001 Billboard.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. AP contributed to this report.

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