The story behind the rise and fall of Death Row Records will appear on the big screen when the documentary "Welcome To Deathrow" is shown Feb. 2 at the Hollywood Black Film Festival in Los Angeles. Th

The story behind the rise and fall of Death Row Records will appear on the big screen when the documentary "Welcome To Deathrow" is shown Feb. 2 at the Hollywood Black Film Festival in Los Angeles. The film, which received no input from imprisoned label-head Suge Knight or Death Row employees, chronicles the label from its initial impact on the gangsta rap scene in 1992-93 up to 1996, when Dr. Dre left the label and Tupac Shakur was shot to death.

The film's director, Xenon Pictures CEO/Founder S. Leigh Savidge, says he discovered while making the movie that the people close to Death Row generally fall into two catagories. "Those that made out like bandits, aren't talking, and want the story to become buried history," says Savidge, "and those who are still stunned by Death Row's astonishing success but who were humbled, misused, or simply relieved to have survived the experience."

"Welcome To Death Row" also sheds some light on Michael Harris' involvement in the creation of the label and his conflicts with his partners, Knight and Death Row lawyer David Kenner.

In other movie news, Destiny Child's Beyonce Knowles has earned the starring role in the MTV film "Carmen: A Hip Hopera," which is set to be broadcast later this year. Dubbed the "first hip-hop musical" by the cable network, the modernized tale of Carmen takes place in Philadelphia. Rapper Da Brat will narrate the story, which will also feature performances Jermaine Dupri and Rah Digga.C