The police officer who found a gun in the vehicle that Sean "Puffy" Combs used to flee a 1999 nightclub shooting testified yesterday (Feb. 8) in New York that the driver of the vehicle told him the gu

The police officer who found a gun in the vehicle that Sean "Puffy" Combs used to flee a 1999 nightclub shooting testified yesterday (Feb. 8) in New York that the driver of the vehicle told him the gun was his, then recanted.

Police Officer Wiliam Meyer said he was doing the paperwork on the arrests of Combs and others who had been in the sports utility vehicle when the driver, Wardell Fenderson, told him he had something to say. "I asked him what was going on, and he said the gun was his," Meyer said. But as Fenderson was about to be fingerprinted, he withdrew the claim.

"He told me that the gun was not his and he was not going to take the rap for anybody else," Meyer said.

Combs, his protege Jamal "Shyne" Barrow, and bodyguard Anthony "Wolf" Jones are on trial in connection with the shooting at Club New York on Dec. 27, 1999. Barrow, 21, is charged with attempted murder for allegedly shooting three people during a dispute at the club. Combs, 31, and Jones, 34, are charged with gun possession and bribery. They have pleaded innocent.

Fenderson, who was not charged, is expected to testify for the prosecution that Combs offered him a $50,000 cash bribe if he would tell police the gun in the SUV was his.

Earlier yesterday, a police sergeant testified that he never saw Combs or anyone in his entourage throw a gun from their vehicle as they fled a nightclub shooting. A gun prosecutors have said was thrown from the vehicle was found along the vehicle's route from the nightclub.

Sgt. Jack Konstantinidis said he followed the vehicle for 11 blocks after it sped from a Times Square nightclub on Dec. 27, 1999, and finally forced it to stop. Under questioning from Combs' attorney, Benjamin Brafman, Konstantinidis said he did not see anyone throw a gun out a window and the vehicle's windows were closed when he stopped it.

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Copyright 2001 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
The police officer who found a gun in the vehicle that Sean "Puffy" Combs used to flee a 1999 nightclub shooting testified yesterday (Feb. 8) in New York that the driver of the vehicle told him the gun was his, then recanted.

Police Officer Wiliam Meyer said he was doing the paperwork on the arrests of Combs and others who had been in the sports utility vehicle when the driver, Wardell Fenderson, told him he had something to say. "I asked him what was going on, and he said the gun was his," Meyer said. But as Fenderson was about to be fingerprinted, he withdrew the claim.

"He told me that the gun was not his and he was not going to take the rap for anybody else," Meyer said.

Combs, his protege Jamal "Shyne" Barrow, and bodyguard Anthony "Wolf" Jones are on trial in connection with the shooting at Club New York on Dec. 27, 1999. Barrow, 21, is charged with attempted murder for allegedly shooting three people during a dispute at the club. Combs, 31, and Jones, 34, are charged with gun possession and bribery. They have pleaded innocent.

Fenderson, who was not charged, is expected to testify for the prosecution that Combs offered him a $50,000 cash bribe if he would tell police the gun in the SUV was his.

Earlier yesterday, a police sergeant testified that he never saw Combs or anyone in his entourage throw a gun from their vehicle as they fled a nightclub shooting. A gun prosecutors have said was thrown from the vehicle was found along the vehicle's route from the nightclub.

Sgt. Jack Konstantinidis said he followed the vehicle for 11 blocks after it sped from a Times Square nightclub on Dec. 27, 1999, and finally forced it to stop. Under questioning from Combs' attorney, Benjamin Brafman, Konstantinidis said he did not see anyone throw a gun out a window and the vehicle's windows were closed when he stopped it.

Copyright 2001 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.t