Perhaps it's a wave started by Carlos Santana, whose Arista comeback album "Supernatural" earned him a record tying eight Grammys last year. Indeed, while the music charts seem dominated by younger ta

Perhaps it's a wave started by Carlos Santana, whose Arista comeback album "Supernatural" earned him a record tying eight Grammys last year. Indeed, while the music charts seem dominated by younger talent, veteran artists such as Steely Dan and U2 took ho me many of the most coveted trophies (see earlier report) at the 43rd annual Grammy Awards last night (Feb. 21) in Los Angeles.

Rock duo Steely Dan, who up until last night had never won a Grammy, snagged album of the year and best pop album for "Two Ag ainst Nature" (Giant) their first studio set in nearly two decades. They also won best pop performance by a duo or group for the track "Cousin Dupree."

Pitted against fellow veteran Paul Simon and a crop of young chart-toppers such as Radiohead, Beck, an d Eminem, the pair seemed as surprised by their album of the year victory as anyone. "I thought Eminem was going to win," Steely Dan's Walter Becker said backstage.

Among U2's three Grammys were the prestigious song and record of the year awards for ''Be autiful Day.'' Veteran bluesman B.B. King was a double winner, sharing the Grammy for best pop collaboration with vocals with Dr. John for their duet "Is You Is, Or Is You Ain't (My Baby)," from the MCA album "Let The Good Times Roll." King also shared th e best traditional blues album honor with Eric Clapton for their collaboration "Riding With The King" (Reprise).

The Temptations won the best traditional R&B vocal album Grammy -- just the fourth of their 40-plus year career -- for the Motown set "Ear-Re sistible." Joni Mitchell, who presented an award with Santana during the show, won the best traditional pop vocal album award for her Reprise set "Both Sides Now." The album's title track, a No. 8 hit for Judy Collins in 1968, earned a Grammy for arranger Vince Mendoza for best instrumental arrangement accompanying a vocalist.

Country vets weren't ignored either. Blasters principal Dave Alvin earned his first Grammy for best traditional folk album for "Public Domain -- Songs From The Wild Land" (Highton e). Johnny Cash won the best male country vocal performance for the track "Solitary Man" from his Columbia album "American III: Solitary Man." It marked the ninth Grammy Cash has won in his career, not counting the 1999 Lifetime Achievement award he recei ved from the Recording Academy.

Dolly Parton won the best bluegrass album award for the critically acclaimed Sugar Hill set "The Grass Is Blue," while Emmylou Harris' "Red Dirt Girl" (Nonesuch) won the best contemporary folk honor.

Elton John, who perf ormed a duet with controversial rapper Eminem, also walked away with a Grammy for best musical show album for "Elton John And Tim Rice's Aida" (Buena Vista). Last year, John was honored with a Grammy legend award.

Other mainstays who took home awards were Taj Mahal and the Phantom Blues Band, who won best contemporary blues album for "Shoutin' In Key" (Hannibal); and recent Billboard Century Award Winner Randy Newman, who won best song written for a motion picture, television, or other visual media for "When She Loved Me," which was sung by Sarah McLachlan in "Toy Story 2."

After seven prior nominations, Japanese keyboardist Kitaro won his first Grammy for "Thinking Of You" (Domo), which was named best new age album.

Copyright 2001 Billboard.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. AP contributed to this report.

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