A federal judge gave the recording industry another victory today (March 6) in its bid to control digital music. U.S. District Judge Marilyn Hall Patel issued an injunction she reworked on the order o

A federal judge gave the recording industry another victory today (March 6) in its bid to control digital music. U.S. District Judge Marilyn Hall Patel issued an injunction she reworked on the order of an appeals court, saying the recording industry will have to notify Napster of songs they want banned from the controversial music file-swapping service.

A label must supply the title of the song, the name of the artist, and the name of the file containing the infringing material. From this point, Napster has just 72 hours to block any copyrighted songs from the service, which has drawn more than 50 million people into a free-music frenzy. Over the weekend, Napster began a screening system in an effort to weed out copyrighted material.

Hilary Rosen, president of the Record Industry Association Of America, said the record labels would comply fully with the court's order. Napster officials were not immediately available for comment.

"We are gratified the District Court acted so promptly in issuing its injunction requiring Napster to remove infringing works from its system," Rosen said. "We intend to provide the notifications prescribed by the Court expeditiously, and look forward to the end of Napster's infringing activity."

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled last month that an original injunction against Napster issued by Patel was too broad because it placed the entire burden on Napster of ensuring that no "copying, downloading, uploading, transmitting or distributing" of works occur.

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