At least 12 songs from aborted studio sessions for what later became the Dave Matthews Band's "Everyday" album have turned up on music download sites, including controversial file-swapping site Napste

At least 12 songs from aborted studio sessions for what later became the Dave Matthews Band's "Everyday" album have turned up on music download sites, including controversial file-swapping site Napster. It's a highly ironic turn of events for the chart-topping act, who earlier this year pacted with Napster to make the single "I Did It" available for free download.

Both the band's manager and publicist had no comment on the latest developments.

As Billboard.com first reported in October, DMB halted work with producer Steve Lillywhite in the group's Charlottesville, Va.-based home studio, and started from scratch in Los Angeles with producer Glen Ballard. None of the Charlottesville tracks wound up on "Everyday," which debuted at No. 1 on The Billboard 200 earlier this month and is at No. 2 on the chart this week.

Several of the Lillywhite songs, including "Grey Street," "JTR," and "Digging A Ditch," have been part of DMB's live repertoire for some time. But as Matthews told Billboard.com recently, his gloomy state of mind -- as opposed to any inferred lack of quality in the material -- was the key to the decision to abandon the Charlottesville sessions.

"I just was feeling terrible, about the process at least," Matthews said. "The music that was coming out was, I think, some of my favorite songs I've ever written. But the whole mood around it.. it didn't have a lot of movement, and I wanted movement."

"We're certainly not going to throw away the recordings we made," he continued. "We're also not going to throw the songs away. We'll certainly play 'Bartender' and 'Grey Street' and 'Grace Is Gone,' because they're fun songs to play [live]."

On the whole, the Lillywhite sessions do have a more relaxed, laid-back feel than the concise rock songs that populate "Everyday." Tracks such as "Monkey Man," with its brooding refrain and extended horn solo, hearken back to older DMB fare such as "Cry Freedom" and "#41."

Fan reaction to the Charlottesville sessions has been mixed. On the message board of popular fan site Nancies.org, some fans doubt the veracity of the tracks, claiming that they have been pieced together from live performances. Others insist that the ill-fated album sessions are closer to the DMB sound they have come to love than what was released on "Everyday."

"You can have your three-minute pop songs, and we'll take the violins, saxes, and 'demos' any day," wrote one fan on the DMB newsgroup. "I wish DMB would officially release these. Steve deserves the credit," wrote another.

As previously reported, the band will kick off an extensive North American tour April 21 with a benefit concert in its hometown. A second show, set for the following day, has just been added to the itinerary; tickets go on-sale this weekend.