Last Saturday's Bon Jovi-headlined charity concert in Melbourne grossed Australian $1.7 million (U.S. $850,000). The show, to raise funds for flood-stricken farmers, drew 34,000 people to the Colonial

Last Saturday's Bon Jovi-headlined charity concert in Melbourne grossed Australian $1.7 million
(U.S. $850,000). The show, to raise funds for flood-stricken farmers, drew 34,000 people to the Colonial Stadium. However, the falling Australian dollar saw production costs soaring close to A$1 million (U.S. $500,000). It involved transporting 70 tons of Bon Jovi's equipment in a jumbo jet from the U.S. The band was on its way to Japan, but diverted for two days to do the show.

Paul Krige, managing director of Universal Music Australia, says A$300,000 was made from ticket sales alone. An extra $50,000 is expected to be raised from an April 15 telethon, held nationally by the Seven Network, which will screen the Colonial Stadium show on that day. Proceeds will go to the State Emergency Services and Volunteer Bushfire Service.

Jon Bon Jovi later declared that the jetlagged band had risen to the occasion, saying that the two-hour set was the best they'd done in Australia. The frontman pulled out all the stadium rock tricks, from grabbing a girl out of the audience to sing to her, hi-fiving the front row, imitating a Southern Baptist preacher, and draping himself with the Australian flag.

Bon Jovi was joined onstage by top-selling Australian R&B singer Jimmy Barnes, who dueted with Jon Bon Jovi on a number of songs, including the Easybeats' '60s hit "Good Times." Barnes had a hit with the track in the late '80s, as a duet with late INXS singer Michael Hutchence.

The show also included sets from Australian and New Zealand-based acts such as Grinspoon, Mavis's, Primary, and Zed. At least six tracks from Bon Jovi's set will be included as an Australia-only bonus CD with the group's forthcoming live album, due in April.