Napster president Hank Barry, veteran rocker Ted Nugent, and EMI Recorded Music president/CEO Ken Berry have joined Don Henley on the list of those slated to testify at tomorrow's Senate Commerce Comm

Napster president Hank Barry, veteran rocker Ted Nugent, and EMI Recorded Music president/CEO Ken Berry have joined Don Henley on the list of those slated to testify at tomorrow's Senate Commerce Committee hearing on Internet music issues, sources tell Billboard Bulletin.

Also slated to testify: Michael Robertson, CEO, MP3.com; Dick Parsons, COO, AOL/Time Warner; Gerry Kearby, CEO, Liquid Audio; Mike Farrace of Tower Online; Ed Murphy, CEO, National Music Publishers Assn.; Hilary Rosen, president/CEO, Recording Industry Association Of America, and Jack Valenti, president/CEO, Motion Picture Assn. of America. An advocate from the Consumer's Union Of America may be added.

Henley is also to discuss the same issues on ABC-TV's "World News Tonight with Peter Jennings" this week.

In related news, artist rights organization Artists Against Piracy has severed ties with the RIAA, its primary financial supporter. The split stems largely from Artists Against Piracy's broader agenda. The organization plans to go beyond the scope of educating the public and representing artists on digital copyright piracy issues and take on broader artist rights issues with the record labels.

"Artists Against Piracy is about protecting the artists' rights in a digital space, but some of these rights are in conflict with the record industry," said Noah Stone, executive director of Artists Against Piracy, which has had support from such acts as Alanis Morissette, Christina Aguilera, Dwight Yoakam, and Barenaked Ladies. "The law right now favors the labels over the artists in terms of digital performance rights."

Hilary Rosen, president and CEO of the RIAA, said, "I think there are more common interests between the artists and record companies than diverging interests. We will continue to work towards common interests."

As labels and artists are deeply dedicated to protecting the copyrights of sound recordings with the advent of free music services like Napster, Stone noted that "copyrights do need to be protected, and there will continue to be many issues on which the artists and the labels are in line, and we hope to continue to work with them on them."

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