In its third compliance report to U.S. District Court in San Francisco, Napster says it has blocked 311,504 artist and song-title pairings and 1.7 million file names from its service, Billboard Bullet

In its third compliance report to U.S. District Court in San Francisco, Napster says it has blocked 311,504 artist and song-title pairings and 1.7 million file names from its service, Billboard Bulletin reports. In the document, filed April 3, Napster outlines seven steps it has taken to improve its filtering process, including adding a third screening technology, hiring 15 employees to manually identify songs, and removing users who post songs anonymously.

The company says it has spent $750,000 for a six-month license of Gracenote's database of approximately 140,000 song-title and artist variations and 3 million file-name variations.

In the report, Napster estimates that 30% of its full-time staff is working to block tracks from the service. The company now claims it can block, on average, 50% of the 220 files typically traded by an average user. However, in a spot check of the service by Bulletin for Metallica's "Enter Sandman," of the 20 file names listed for the song, at least one could be successfully downloaded.

In previous reports outlining its attempts to comply with the modified preliminary injunction handed down March 5 by Judge Marilyn Hall Patel, Napster blasted the Recording Industry Association Of America (RIAA) for not submitting the proper data needed to block tracks.

The new report reiterates that claim, but in its March 27 report to the court, the RIAA denied those accusations. The two sides are scheduled to meet before Judge Patel tomorrow (April 10) to discuss compliance issues..