A U.K. record company has lost its bid to release early Bruce Springsteen recordings against his wishes. Judges at London's Court of Appeal today (April 10) refused Masquerade Music permission to appe

A U.K. record company has lost its bid to release early Bruce Springsteen recordings against his wishes. Judges at London's Court of Appeal today (April 10) refused Masquerade Music permission to appeal an earlier court ruling that Springsteen owns the copyright to the recordings.

In December 1998, the High Court banned the London-based company and its director, Ronald Winter, from releasing copies of the album "Before the Fame." The firm had imported 75 copies of the recording and "threatened to release many further copies," said the High Court judge, Francis Ferris.

"Before the Fame" features songs recorded in the early 1970s, before the release of the singer's 1973 Coumbia debut album "Greetings from Asbury Park, N.J." Springsteen argued that Masquerade's attempt to claim ownership of the songs' copyright was an attack on his artistic integrity.

Winter claimed Ferris had allowed inadmissible evidence and applied the wrong standard of proof. But a panel of three judges refused Winter permission to appeal to the House of Lords, Britain's highest court of appeal.

Springsteen, who already has been awarded $725,000 in legal costs, also won the costs of the appeal, to be determined.

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