As one of the most indelibly individual of postwar composers for orchestra, the 85-year-old Henri Dutilleux is known far more for the supra-Debussyian impressionism of his large-ensemble works than fo

As one of the most indelibly individual of postwar composers for orchestra, the 85-year-old Henri Dutilleux is known far more for the supra-Debussyian impressionism of his large-ensemble works than for his few chamber or solo pieces. Still, his melodically modernist Piano Sonata of 1948 is one of the most striking of late-20th century French solo instrumentals—and it stands out as the earliest composition that the meticulous composer recognizes as part of his true oeuvre. Controversially, Anne Queffélec and her producer chose to include several early piano miniatures that Dutilleux has since withdrawn. A composer's wishes ought to be respected—yet the subtle beauties of even 1946's Au Gré des Ondes are such that it's hard to argue. While not as commanding as John Ogdon (in his classic EMI take on the sonata), Queffélec is perhaps a more atmospheric, idiomatic player, and her renditions of the sonata and the latter-day three Préludes make a smart case for these unjustly neglected works. Christian Ivaldi joins for 1970's dynamic Figures de Résonances for two pianos. This 1996 title is now widely available in the U.S. as part of Allegro's commendable special-import distribution deal with EMI.—BB

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