After taking a decade to complete Centerfield, John Fogerty needed only one year to produce its follow-up, Eye of the Zombie, originally issued by Warner Bros.

After taking a decade to complete Centerfield, John Fogerty needed only one year to produce its follow-up, Eye of the Zombie, originally issued by Warner Bros. in 1986. Unlike its Creedence-hued predecessor, Eye of the Zombie showcased a greatly expanded stylistic range, as well as heightened production values. This is apparent from the opening cut, "Goin' Back Home," an ethereal instrumental, save for a wordless chorus. The bulk of the songs on this disc deal with the artist's intense social and political observations. "Soda Pop," which features Fogerty condemning his generation's consumerist cop-out, is one such example. Musically, Fogerty eschews the swamp for a horn-fed Memphis soul vibe on "Knockin' on Your Door," although the pessimistic "Change in the Weather" has a bluesy gospel tone that is right at home with his earlier work. Then again, "Violence Is Golden" employs a variety of sonic effects, and "Soda Pop" is rather funky. Ultimately, it may have been too much a stretch for fans of Centerfield, which could explain why it came up short commercially. In retrospect, though, it's another gem.—J

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