The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) has filed a copyright-infringement suit against peer-to-peer software developer AbovePeer Inc., which distributes Aimster, and its owner John Deep,

The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) has filed a copyright-infringement suit against peer-to-peer software developer AbovePeer Inc., which distributes Aimster, and its owner John Deep, Billboard Bulletin reports. Aimster allows consumers to trade files among users on "buddy lists." The RIAA claims the software violates copyright law and is not restricted list members.

"The truth is, you do not need to have any buddies to use Aimster," says the RIAA in a statement. "It works with or without a buddy list." The suit was filed yesterday (May 24) in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.

Albany, N.Y.-based AbovePeer last month filed a complaint against the RIAA, claiming that the trade group had targeted it for copyright infringement. The filing, in U.S. District Court in Albany, seeks a declaration that Aimster is protected from liability under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). AbovePeer attorney George Carpinello says a hearing is set for Wednesday (May 30) to determine if the company's case against the RIAA will be dismissed or if the two suits will be consolidated.

The RIAA also filed a copyright-infringement suit against Launch Media yesterday in the same court. The suit claims that the company's Web radio service, LAUNCHcast, contains interactive elements that are not covered under its licensing agreements with certain labels. Launch responds in a statement: "We strongly believe that LAUNCHcast complies with the DMCA, and we plan to continue talks with the RIAA to ensure a positive outcome." Launch has temporarily disabled the service.

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