Argentine band Bersuit Vergarabat—more commonly referred to simply as Bersuit—offers a follow-up to 1998's fabulous Libertinaje that somehow manages to top one of Latin rock's most memor

Argentine band Bersuit Vergarabat—more commonly referred to simply as Bersuit—offers a follow-up to 1998's fabulous Libertinaje that somehow manages to top one of Latin rock's most memorable releases. Hijo del Culo (which loosely translates to Sons of the Rear End)—an ode to society's misfits—is long, fun, and excellent. The tricky balance of blending folk with rock is achieved seamlessly here, thanks to outstanding musicianship (bolstered by the fat sound of a nine-piece band, encompassing horns, strings, and bandoneon, along with lush vocal harmonies) and consistently good songs, each their own tale. Bersuit dips freely into Argentine folklore ("La Vida Boba" is a milonga, "Negra Murguera" is obviously a murga, "La Petisita Culon" is a cuartetazo), mixing it with ska, reggae, Brazilian rhythms, and even flamenco. Throughout, and this is where many other roqueros should take note, Bersuit's quirkiness never overshadows the stronger elements of melody and lyric.—LC

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